Photos

 

What's bugging your garden?

What's bugging your garden?

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    Yellow Poplar Weevil
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    Elm bladder leaf gall
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    Grape Filbert Gall
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    Rose Chafer Beetle...very destructive / very similar to Japanese Beetle damages
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    Aphids under Okra
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    Colorado Potato Beetle
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    Yellow Bellied Sap Sucker
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    Cedar apple rust on junipers
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    Common groundsel...annual weed...seeds heavily...hand pull (before it seeds), spot treat with Roundup...pre emergent does not control seeds.
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    Nostoc Balls (nostoc algae)
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    Air Potato
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    Chinese Yam
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    Cinnamon Vine Very invasive!
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    Greater Angle-Wing nymph
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    BAGWORMS!!! BOO!!!!
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    Male Dobson Fly
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    Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly Caterpillar
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    Parsley Worm
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    Blossom End Rot
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    Slime Mold
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    Poke Weed
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    Squash Bugs
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    Squash bugs (babies) and eggs
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    Bladder gall on Maple
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    June Bugs
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    Birch Leafminer Disease
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    Tent Caterpillars
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    Stink Horn Fungus
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    Swallowtail breeding in Minnesota
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    Antelope? - Roswell New Mexico
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    A Texas Sized Grasshopper
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    Tomato Horn Worm being attacked
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    Monarch Butterfly Caterpillar
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    Budworm in rose
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    Dragonfly
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    Earwigs - Ewwww!
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    Parsley worm
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    Antelope in Roswell New Mexico
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    Nymph of a harlequin bug
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    Catalpa worm with parasites on back.
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    Tiger swallowtail butterfly
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    Tomato Hornworm
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    grape phylloxeran galls on wild grape vine
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    Crabgrass
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    Fall webworm
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    Hornworm under attack
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    Cecropia moth caterpillar
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    Cicada Killer Wasps
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    Cicada Killer Wasp Mounds
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    Catalpa worms with parasitic wasp larvae feeding on it
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    That’s a type of carrion beetle. The larvae of this beetle feeds on dried carrion, sinew, and skin. The adults feed on maggots. The beetle doesn’t have a common name, but it does have a descriptive scientific name: Necrophilia americana.
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    In terms of posing a threat, this beetle poses no threat as long as a person keeps moving around and doesn’t act badly (like a maggot).
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    Mycosphaerella Leaf spot on ash
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    Masked Chafers feeding on small pin oak leaves
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    As Homer Simpson would say - "Doe"
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    Blossom End Rot
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    Nutgrass / Nutsedge
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    Parsleyworm - turns into a black swallowtail butterfly
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    Dog Barf Fungus
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    Slug Damage on Hosta
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    Euonymus scale
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    These scarlet oak sawfly larvae are so cool, they�re wearing sunglasses
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    this is how the growers protect blueberries from the birds
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    Bobcat just strolled along my backyard wall!! ML in Arizona
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    Roundup damage on tomato.
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    Rose slug damage on roses.
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    Cecropia moth
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    Wild Parsnip
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    Caterpillar Damage on tomatoes
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    Painted Hickory Beetle
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    Leaf Gall
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    New Urban Beekeeper
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    Katydid
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    Tent Caterpillars
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    Baby Hummingbird
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    Mantis egg sacks
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    Milkweed Nymphs
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    Milkweed Bugs
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    Mantis Coccoon
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    Friendly Bee
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    Voles not moles
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    Voles not moles
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    Voles not moles
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    Voles not moles
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    Mantis cocoon
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    Mantis cocoon
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    Bill in Indiana
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    Male Red Bellied Woodpecker
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    Mourning Dove
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    Red Bellied Woodpecker
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    Starling
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    Yellow Finches
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    Blue Jay
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    Downey Woodpecker
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    Flicker
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    House Finches
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    Woodpecker in Walton Kentucky
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    Blue Birds in Columbus Ohio
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    Cambium miners
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    These are small flies and are fairly common on a variety of trees.
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    Powdery mildew on turf in late November...very unusual.
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    Question - Ron it seems that my bumblebees are dying. HELP!
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    Those are actually carpenter bees (black shiny abdomens), and they, like bumblebees, feed on pollen as well.
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    But, as I have learned from our bee lady Barb, the reason they (and all bees) are slow is because of the cooler weather.
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    Bees are poikilothermic – their energy level is regulated by temperature. Newly emerged carpenter bees generally find a protected place to over winter and fire back up next spring when it warms up.
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    Nothing wrong...nothing for you to do. But, we do appreciate your concern about the bees.